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Year 11 Subject Change Information

Year 11 students are reminded that subject changes may only occur at the completion of Unit One or Unit Two. Once students have commenced Unit Three, they are not permitted to change subjects because of QCAA guidelines. This means that Year 11 students have two opportunities this year to change subjects. These are in the two weeks immediately after May 25 and again after October 5. Year 12 students are NOT permitted to change subjects.

If students wish to change subjects at the end Unit One, they should take note of the following procedures:

  • All students must complete an application to change subject form. These are available from College Reception.
  • Application forms must be signed by parents and by the Subject Co-ordinators of both the discontinued and new subjects.
  • Students should not pick subjects based on lines. Instead they should refer to the subject guides and select a subject they wish to study. Line changes regularly occur when subject change forms are submitted due to current class sizes.
  • You will not be contacted if the subject change was approved. You will only be contacted if the change cannot be approved.
  • Forms are available now, but changes will not occur until after May 25. Students should check Student Café regularly after this date as approved changes will appear on your timetable.
  • Students who need additional career guidance are encouraged to make an appointment with the college counsellor Ms Danika Hurley.

Students and parents are encouraged to contact the College reception if they have any questions regarding the change of subject process.

Curriculum Information 2020 - Exam Block/ Reporting Periods/ Year 11 Change of Subject

Although many parents might be lamenting the current online learning scenario and earnestly wishing for a speedy return to normality, this situation offers unparalleled opportunities for quality learning. The enforced absence of most students from school has thrown the necessity of reading comprehension into very sharp relief. Students are being tasked with written instructions that are issued without the usual, teacher-led, ‘voice-over’ to clarify or enlarge upon portions of text that are italicized or underscored for emphasis.

M. Scott Peck writing from more than twenty years ago, lamented that the greatest problem of our age was simplistic thinking. He rightly identified thinking, as a difficult, complex process, with a course of direction, a lapse of time, and a series of steps or stages that lead to some result. He observed that to think well is a laborious, often painstaking process until one becomes accustomed to being ‘thoughtful’. The fact is that the same principles apply when it comes to being able to read with a refined and nuanced understanding. Many intelligent students are hobbled and handicapped by the fact that society has prioritised acquiring technological dexterity over developing reading comprehension. In the last two weeks, I have been amazed at the swiftness with which many staff have acquired technological skills, which only tends to reinforce the notion that they are a mere tool, whose use facilitates access to material that requires far more complex cognitive processes.

This period also provides students with an opportunity to spend extended periods writing.

 I spend a significant portion of my teaching time stressing the connection between the capacity to think and one’s ability to write. If we spend the first four or so years of our schooling learning to write, then the remaining eight are about, or should be about, writing to learn. Ultimately, the success of any schooling system, be it public or private, is the extent to which we succeed in developing the capacity for independent thought, and I do mean independent thought. Scott Peck says we are suffering from a psychiatric illness commonly known as passive dependent personality disorder. Such dependency is, at root, a disorder related to thinking – specifically, a resistance to thinking for ourselves. Everybody recognises that in the context of an argument, one’s own views are sharpened, defined and refined. Assignments and the lengthy process that ought to be engaged in when creating them, is an opportunity for our own internal argument to develop – an argument with oneself. The actual writing of the assignment should never be the ‘end point’ or culmination of the process, it is the process. Writing is an integral, inseparable part of thinking. Very often we have no idea what we truly think until we commit our thoughts to paper. Paper gives us an opportunity to assess the depth, plausibility and validity of our thought. What sounds plausible in your mind, is often laughable in ink.

Maybe one day our students will look back at this period of adversity and difficulty in their lives and echo Winston Churchill’s immortal words: “This was our finest hour”.

Changes to Exam Block and Reporting Periods The Year 11 exam block which was originally scheduled for Week 5 of Term 2 (18 – 22 May) has been cancelled. The reporting period for both Year 11 and 12 will now occur at the end of the Semester. Progressive updating of results for individual subjects will continue to be available throughout the course of the term through Student Café and Parent Lounge.

Year 11 Change of Subject There are very few opportunities for Students in Year 11 to make subject changes and the first of only two opportunities is fast approaching. Year 11 students will transition into Unit Two at the beginning of Week 6, the same week they are due to be back at school. Because there is a high probability that Covid-19 restrictions will prevent the scheduled face-to-face parent/teacher/student conferencing from taking place, teachers will be making recommendations to parents when the available evidence indicates that a change of subject might be advisable. Teachers will begin making telephone calls from 11 May onwards.

A time for discipline – remember HMS Birkenhead - Reflection from Mr Sean Geoghegan

Kent Nerburn in his book ‘Letters to my son’ wrote a chapter dedicated to tragedy and suffering. In that chapter he states: “Tragedy and suffering will come to you. You cannot insulate yourself from them. You cannot avoid them. They come in their own season and in their own time.” He goes on to say that the great lesson of suffering comes from the fact that when all is going well, our world is a small controlled experience bounded by our daily necessities. Going to Canelands, completing or marking an assignment, mowing the lawn – these are the levels of concern that occupy our daily lives. When tragedy and suffering come swooping in, they are unexpected, unforeseen, unprepared for. They shatter our tiny boundaries and break our world into pieces. There can be little doubt that the contagion of the Coronavirus will sorely test us in the days to come, but the most important lessons that our children will internalise, is how the adults around them reacted and dealt with such adversity. What kind of example will we set for them? It does not look promising. There are so many examples of acts of extreme selfishness, with people hoarding items and stripping supermarket shelves bare. The story of the discipline of the soldiers and sailors on HMS Birkenhead in the 1800s inspired an entire generation of Victorian Englishmen, on the virtues of discipline.

 

For those unfamiliar with the story, the sinking of the royal navy ship HMS Birkenhead in 1852, was a maritime disaster during which the conduct of the passengers, which included British soldiers, sailors and civilians became legendary. This ship, struck a hidden reef off the African coast. The ship broke in two and there were insufficient lifeboats for all on board. The soldiers were instructed to stand aside and they stood to attention on the deck of the sinking ship thereby allowing the women and children time to board the life-boats safely and escape. The soldiers' chivalry gave rise to the unofficial "women and children first" protocol when abandoning ship. The incident was later immortalised by the poet laureate of the British Empire, Rudyard Kipling, whose poem came to describe discipline in face of the most hopeless circumstances.

 

 A British Army captain described the conduct of the soldiers:

 

The order and regularity that prevailed on board, from the moment the ship struck till she totally disappeared, far exceeded anything that I had thought could be affected by the best discipline; and it is the more to be wondered at seeing that most of the soldiers were but a short time in the service. Everyone did as he was directed and there was not a murmur or cry amongst them until the ship made her final plunge – all received their orders and carried them out as if they were embarking instead of going to the bottom – I never saw any embarkation conducted with so little noise or confusion.

 

Unlike HMS Birkenhead, our circumstances are very far from being hopeless. However, we do need to abandon rumour mongering and practice profound consideration for others. The every-man-for-himself culture, which has become so pervasive in the twenty-first century, could yet prove to be our undoing. To every parent out there, our children are watching us – we dare not let them down.

war

Enrolment Processes for 2021

Enrolment applications for Year 11 2021 at St Patrick’s College are now open and can be accessed through the Quick Links area on the Home Page of our website - http://www.stpats.qld.edu.au/index.php/2012-07-06-00-31-36

Dates in relation to the enrolment process are listed below for your information if you have a student in Year 10 or you know of others who may be interested in enrolling in the College next year.

4 June

Introduction to Senior Schooling will commence at 6:30pm via an online stream. All prospective Year 11 students and parents, are strongly advised to watch. Please register your interest for enrolment in 2021 by completing the online enrolment application or emailing This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. . A link will be emailed to registered parties.

23 July

Subject Selection Evening from 3:30pm – 6:30pm in St Patrick’s Hall.   Attend at a time to suit your family.

29 July

Due date for completion of online Enrolment application and Subject Selection forms to be returned to St Patrick’s College.

10 August

Notification of enrolment interview date emailed out during week commencing 10 August.

24 August

Formal enrolment and subject advisory interviews with a member of the College Leadership Team will begin during the week of 24 August.

End term 3

Notification of acceptance.

26 November

Orientation Day.

Valuable information from the College Library.

Valuable information from the College Library

The library is a great place to start on assignments. We are open from 7:30 am – 4:00 pm Monday to Thursday and Friday 7:30 am to 3:30 pm. Our catalogue is accessed via https://libcollege.rok.catholic.edu.au/oliver/OpacLogin?corporation=StPatricksMackay. Scroll down to St Patrick’s College Mackay – click Go.

This will take you to our search screen. It can be search for many types of resources. Books and periodicals are a good place to start. The search screen will help you find our news feed and provide access to onsite and other off-site resources. Remember to use the bookmarks available from the Library for the databases held at the College.

Our library home page can be accessed via the College website Students -> Lib guides or by going directly to the homepage https://stpats.qld.edu.au.libguides.com/library will provide help for undertaking assignments.

We supplement our College databases with those available through the State Library of Queensland. To register as a user, go to https://patron.slq.qld.gov.au/Register. Read the Terms and Conditions (as a registered member of the Queensland State Library, observe the usual terms and conditions, attributing the source of content and limits of material to be copied.)

Search for the database that you require. The SLQ does not have all the databases that you may require.

This is the search screen for the State Library of Queensland or http://onesearch.slq.qld.gov.au/primo-explore/dbsearch?vid=SLQ&sortby=rank&lang=en_US

There are free resources available from the University of Queensland https://guides.library.uq.edu.au/. These resources cover many of the ATAR subjects. Students are encouraged to make use of resources that are from other educational sites such as universities.

Year 11 Subject Change Information
30 Apr 2020

Year 11 students are reminded that subject changes may only occur at the completion of Unit One or Unit Two. Once students have commenced Unit Three, they are not permitted to change subjects because of QCAA guidelines. This means that Year 11 studen ... 

Read More
Curriculum Information 2020 - Exam Block/ Reportin...
30 Apr 2020

Although many parents might be lamenting the current online learning scenario and earnestly wishing for a speedy return to normality, this situation offers unparalleled opportunities for quality learning. The enforced absence of most students from sc ... 

Read More
Enrolment Processes for 2021
30 Apr 2020

Enrolment applications for Year 11 2021 at St Patrick’s College are now open and can be accessed through the Quick Links area on the Home Page of our website - http://www.stpats.qld.edu.au/index.php/2012-07-06-00-31-36 Dates in relation to the enr ... 

Read More
A time for discipline – remember HMS Birkenhead ...
31 Mar 2020A time for discipline – remember HMS Birkenhead - Reflection from Mr Sean Geoghegan

Kent Nerburn in his book ‘Letters to my son’ wrote a chapter dedicated to tragedy and suffering. In that chapter he states: “Tragedy and suffering will come to you. You cannot insulate yourself from them. You cannot avoid them. They come in the ... 

Read More
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